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What Universities and Women in the Science are doing

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Category: Professional Perspectives

Hilary Stout, in a column for Forbes states some of the changing trends regarding the increase of women in math and science fields. For instance, 50% of all MIT undergraduates are women; in Carnegie Mellon women are 30% of the undergraduate students in math and science, up from 17% in 1986. Brown University, together with the National Science Foundation, is making an effort to increase the number of women in its science faculty. Among the best known female leaders are Carol Bartz, CEO of Yahoo, who has a bachelor of science degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Indra Nooyi, CEO of Pepsico, Ursula Burns, an engineer and CEO of Xerox, and Ellen Kullman, CEO of DuPont.

Princeton University reports that 34% of its engineering undergraduate students are females, twice the national average of 17%. The university believes that having more female faculty members is one of the reasons to attract women to this field. Purdue University organizes summer camps for female high school students interested in engineering. Sarah Watson, in a column for Collegiate Times states that the still low participation rate is caused in Middle School, so it’s important to catch the attention of girls at this level in order to increase the number of females in engineering.

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About the Center for the Study of the Workplace.

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Category: Academic Insights

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Without question, the growing list of current and future workforce trends is a challenge for many organizations to both recognize and prepare for. Organizations today are facing the new realities of our global society and the rapid pace of technological change, forcing them to continually develop new solutions for talent development, communications, healthy work settings, leadership/management styles and organizational best practices.

To address these and other related challenges, the Center for the Study of the Workplace built this online platform to participate in the exchange of learning among academic institutions, employers and individuals. Through the UW-Milwaukee School of Continuing Education, the Center for the Study of the Workplace provides access to life-long learning opportunities that benefit both employees and employers across a spectrum of work settings.

I took an opportunity to collect my thoughts, and those from Dr. Patricia Arredondo and Dr. Sammis White, in this video discussing the vision of the Center for the Study of the Workplace.

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Global Trends Affecting the Workplace.

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Category: Changing Demographics

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We recently talked with Melanie Holmes, the vice president of World of Work Solutions at Manpower, about her views on global workforce trends and how work is going to be performed in the future.

In this video, Melanie discusses generational workforce issues and the impending talent shortage as two of many changes forcing organizations to think differently about workplace planning and talent engagement. Her views are supported by Manpower’s 2010 Talent Shortage Survey.

Related Resources:
Manpower Research and Insights
Millennials: Your Next Generation Workforce
Get Ready for the Next Generation of Workers: Linksters

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